Item #20216 Archive of Women's Naval Auxiliary (WAVES) Photographs in W.W.II and After. WWII Women in Military.
Archive of Women's Naval Auxiliary (WAVES) Photographs in W.W.II and After
Archive of Women's Naval Auxiliary (WAVES) Photographs in W.W.II and After
Archive of Women's Naval Auxiliary (WAVES) Photographs in W.W.II and After
Archive of Women's Naval Auxiliary (WAVES) Photographs in W.W.II and After
Archive of Women's Naval Auxiliary (WAVES) Photographs in W.W.II and After
Archive of Women's Naval Auxiliary (WAVES) Photographs in W.W.II and After

Archive of Women's Naval Auxiliary (WAVES) Photographs in W.W.II and After

Photo Archive

[Women in Military] Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service, or “WAVES,” was the US Naval Reserve Women's branch established to replace men stationed ashore to provide more sea duty sailors and officers. Archive contains 13 silver gelatin images, including many with extensive captions on verso. All measure between 8" x 10" and 5.5" x 7.5", and one larger image of marching members in uniforms measuring 10.25" x 12". All in black and white. Dated 1942-1967. Many with identifications. On July 30, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed the Navy Women's Reserve Act into law, creating what was commonly known as the WAVES -- Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service -- a division of the U.S. Navy created during World War II to free up male personnel for sea duty. By the end of 1942, there were 770 WAVES Officers and 3,109 enlisted. These photos document the role of women in WAVES and show them in action, often wearing uniforms, participating in marches, at USO club shows and in the workforce. One early photo from 1942 in the archive shows four women posing in their WAVES uniforms during a new uniform unveiling, all sporting white dixie cup hats and buttoned coats and white gloves. Another photo from a National Metal show in Cleveland in 1946 shows a WAVES woman in uniform assisting a Staff Sergeant. Several photos are group shots including one from the Jones Beach USO Club in 1943 from a day dedicated to women in all branches of military service. Another group shot shows the first six WAVES to become Navy plane crewmen at the Naval Air Transport Service transport training school in San Francisco, where they worked as specialists, learning loading and handling cargo, tying knots, conducting airport safety, signaling and other ground crew procedures. Another photo features a woman operating a "Nuclear furnace" or atomic generator at an Atomic Energy Exhibit in 1951 dedicated to the development of atomic energy at the 7th Regiment Armory in New York City. The largest photo in the archive is of a march at the Great Lakes Naval Training station during a WAVES graduation, featuring nearly 100 women in their white waves uniforms, with two carrying Great Lakes flags, with the photo dated July 8, 1950. The WAVES program offered women who weren’t nurses the first chance to serve in the Navy. Tape on some corners fading from age, many press stamps on verso, with occasional captions pasted to the verso as well. Photos are clear and document an important time for women in the military. Archive is in very good condition.

Item #20216

Price: $1,850.00