Item #19798 Franklin Delano Roosevelt Typed Letter Signed on Malaria, 1929. Franklin Roosevelt.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Typed Letter Signed on Malaria, 1929
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Typed Letter Signed on Malaria, 1929

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Typed Letter Signed on Malaria, 1929

TLS - Typed Letter Signed

Typed letter signed by FDR addressed to "Carp" regarding local matters, including malaria, in Warm Springs, Georgia, his personal retreat and therapeutic center. Two pages with the first page having official letterhead of the Governor of New York, which was Roosevelt's position at the time. September 7, 1929. Measuring 8" x 10.5" with blue printed ink and signature in pen. This letter, just three years before Roosevelt becomes president and mere days before the Stock Market Crash of 1929 that ushered in the Great Depression, sees Roosevelt concerned with issues in Meriwether County, Georgia (home to Warm Springs), such as "the malaria situation", tree planting, and road construction. Roosevelt first came to Warm Springs (then Bullochville) in 1924 for polio treatment, as the town's natural thermal springs were one of the few remedies for the pain and discomfort he experienced ever since contracting the disease in 1921. Warm Springs had had a reputation as a spa town ever since the beginning of the century when vacationers from the yellow fever stricken coastal regions of Georgia ensconced to Warm Springs during the summers. In this letter, we can see Roosevelt take stewardship over the town whose natural springs brought him much relief: "I hope the malaria situation is in hand. I think the county commissioners should have it put up to them very strongly that if Meriwether County gets the reputation for malaria it will absolutely and definitely block any possibility of its development as a health resort fro people from all over the United States. A good sized appropriation by the county ought to be made this year and expended under proper supervision, i.e., not some local veterinarian or deputy sheriff!" This letter is addressed to Roosevelt's friend, business associate, and fellow polio survivor Arthur Carpenter, Esq., of Warm Springs. Roosevelt's influenced loomed large over the town; he even successfully lobbied to have the town's name changed from Bullochville. Ironically, despite his outsized position in the town as Governor of New York and later the longest serving American President, Roosevelt's dwelling, the "Little White House", was rather modest in size and appearance. Roosevelt's connection to the town would continue through on to his last days; he died in Warm Springs after several years of worsening health on April 12, 1945. This letter is an interesting and valuable fusion of local and presidential history. In very good condition overall.

Item #19798

Price: $1,200.00