Item #19672 First Mohonk Conference on the Negro Question, 1890, Documents the Regression that African Americans Experienced After the Gains Made by Reconstruction Failed to Solidify. Conference Mohonk.
First Mohonk Conference on the Negro Question, 1890, Documents the Regression that African Americans Experienced After the Gains Made by Reconstruction Failed to Solidify
First Mohonk Conference on the Negro Question, 1890, Documents the Regression that African Americans Experienced After the Gains Made by Reconstruction Failed to Solidify
First Mohonk Conference on the Negro Question, 1890, Documents the Regression that African Americans Experienced After the Gains Made by Reconstruction Failed to Solidify

First Mohonk Conference on the Negro Question, 1890, Documents the Regression that African Americans Experienced After the Gains Made by Reconstruction Failed to Solidify

First Edition

First Mohonk Conference on the Negro Question Held at Lake Mohonk, Ulster County, New York, June 4, 5, 6, 1890. Reported and Edited by Isabel C. Barrows. Boston: Geo. H. Ellis, 1890. 142 pages. Softcover in modern protective wrapper. 24cm. First free endpaper has original cover laid in. A color copy of the original front cover creates a new protective wrapper. There is also a hardcover copy of this pamphlet by the same publisher but we assume this pamphlet takes precedence over the hardcover. We have never seen another issue of the pamphlet version. The conference was a lily white gathering of white Southerners and Northerners to figure out what to do with African Americans. Reconstruction crusader Albion W. Tourgee attended and did protest the racist composition of the invitees. He also delivered an address to the Conference which was titled "The Negro's View of the Race Problem". His address ended with a proposed resolution that had no chance of passage at this white conference. At this time, Black political rights were being stripped through voter intimidation and disenfranchisement in the South, often through violent means. In the North, employment discrimination and slumlike conditions prevailed. One speaker notes, "In the city of Philadelphia, a colored man may carry mortar up a ladder, but he is not allowed to lay the bricks. He cannot become a master mechanic; he cannot learn bricklaying." This document represents the regression that African Americans experienced after the gains made by Reconstruction failed to solidify. It also presents a detailed though obviously incomplete overview of the forces that advocated for Black social and political rights. Very minor staining in bottom margins. Very good condition overall.

Item #19672

Price: $1,250.00

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