Item #19511 Turn of the Century African American Life in Georgia and the South, 6 Stereoview Photographs. Southern Life African American.
Turn of the Century African American Life in Georgia and the South, 6 Stereoview Photographs
Turn of the Century African American Life in Georgia and the South, 6 Stereoview Photographs

Turn of the Century African American Life in Georgia and the South, 6 Stereoview Photographs

Photo Archive

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Photo Archive of Six stereoview photographs from the late 19th century depicting the African American experience, mainly in Georgia and the American South. Four of the stereoview photographs are published by Strohmeyer & Wyman, one by B.W. Kilburn, and one by H.C. White Co. 1891-1901. Size 3.5” x 7”, each set on cardstock mounts. Black and white, often sepia toned stereoview photographs. Many have captions and placenames, a brief description, or phrases spoken by the subjects, often printed in jive on mount verso . Three of the stereoview photographs from Strohmeyer & Wyman are titled “Cotton is King,” and depict a plantation scene in 1895 Georgia. The photos are all slightly different, and feature a caption on the back translated into six languages. The stereoview photographs are an interesting record of the nature of postbellum Southern Black life. Despite slavery’s abolition a generation before, many rural African Americans were still bonded to the cotton crop through exploitative sharecropping and tenant farming. The three photos show a gathering of between seven and ten African Americans, including an adolescent black child picking cotton. Two of the photographs feature a white man on a horse in the background, possibly a landowner overseeing the work. The third features a young black woman in the foreground along with the child, staring into a basket of cotton. Two separate stereoview photos in this archive feature captions of innuendos directed at the color of the subjects’ skin. caption reading: “No sah. I aint seed yuh chickens.” The second captioned photo features a young black boy on his knees examining a bicycle tire while scratching his head. A cat also stands on the floor beside him, with the caption reading: “How de Debbie Does dey Make a Bicycle?” The final photo is titled: “A Colored Wedding,” and seem to depicts four whites in blackface being married, featuring what appears to be the men dressed as women as well. The photograph was taken and published by Benjamin West Kilburn of Littleton. All six photos are clear and sharp, with only slight wear around the edges. Overall in very good condition. This archive of late 19th century stereoview photographs gives an important view into the casual prejudice that many black Americans were subject to, while also providing a unique glimpse into their lives in Georgia and the South around that time.

Item #19511

Price: $250.00