Item #17548 Archive of Letters from Abolitionist and Suffragist Mary Livermore. Mary Livermore.
Archive of Letters from Abolitionist and Suffragist Mary Livermore
Archive of Letters from Abolitionist and Suffragist Mary Livermore
Archive of Letters from Abolitionist and Suffragist Mary Livermore
Archive of Letters from Abolitionist and Suffragist Mary Livermore

Archive of Letters from Abolitionist and Suffragist Mary Livermore

Archive

LIVERMORE, Mary. American journalist, abolitionist, and advocate of Women's Rights. She campaigned for the Lincoln- Hamlin ticket in 1860, and when the American Civil War broke out, she became connected with the United States Sanitary Commission in Chicago, performing a vast amount of labor of all kinds—organizing auxiliary societies, visiting hospitals and military posts, contributing to the press, answering correspondence, and more. She helped organize the Chicago Fair of 1863, and when the war was over, she instituted a pro-women's suffrage paper called the Agitator, which was afterwards merged in the Woman's Journal. She was editor for two years and a frequent contributor thereafter. She also devoted herself to the Promotion of Women's Suffrage and the Temperance Movement, starting her own Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) Chapter in her hometown of Melrose, Massachusetts. On the lecture platform, she had a remarkable career, speaking mostly in behalf of women's suffrage and the temperance movements. She traveled 25,000 miles annually, speaking five nights each week for five months of the year. This archive includes four signed items. Two autograph letters signed, one autograph quotation signed, and one signed manuscript poem:

Handwritten Autograph Letter Signed, "Mary A Livermore," at Chicago. Dated February 10, 1869. 3 pages. Addressed to "Bro Adams." Livermore writes with regards to the underhanded politics of Charles L. Balch, "the Most Unveracious Man Ever." Never a coward, she pushed Balch to resign from his post at the Ministry after he lied to her about the contents of her own letters. At the end of this letter to Mr Adams, she warns: "Don't let this get into the papers". Large deep vivid black ink signature, "Mary A Livermore" measures 2.75" long at its conclusion.

Autograph Quotation Signed. Dated November 13, 1881. In French,: 'Of all the abilities with which nature has armed us, that of suffering is the only one we can completely exercise. Mme. De Stael. '' Original states: '''De toutes les facultes de l'arme, que nous le-nous [sic] de la nature, celle de souffrir est la seule que nous puissions exercer tout entiere. ' Mme. De Stael. Signed "Mary A. Livermore / Nov. 13" 1881." Single page.

Mary Livermore. Autograph Poem Signed. August 30, 1890. Melrose, Mass. 1 page, 5x7. "And not more sure am I that they, / Whom ocean 's waves divide, / Will meet again, some
happy day, I and linger side by side; - '/ 'Than that the day will surely come, / When we, and all we love, / Will meet with kiss and clasping hands, / In that dear land above. ' I Mary A. Livermore I Aug. 30, 1890. I Melrose, Mass. '' These lines are from an 1885 poem mourning the untimely death of New Hampshire Governor Frederick Smyth's wife Emily.

Handwritten Autograph Letter Signed, "Mary A Livermore," 2 pages on one sheet, Melrose, [MA.]. Dated October 9, 1893. It is addressed to "Ilus. Adams" requesting him to accompany the WCTU Women onto the platform at a speech. She also requests that he introduce the women to the President and to the audience and to stay for comments and questions. This letter is beautifully written in rich blue fountain pen with a large crisp 3" long signature "Mary A Livermore"

Item #17548

Price: $2,200.00