Item #17547 Archive of Suffragist Frances Willard's Signed Letters and First Editions: "Woman is a bright fore-gleam of the better Civilization" Frances Willard.
Archive of Suffragist Frances Willard's Signed Letters and First Editions: "Woman is a bright fore-gleam of the better Civilization"

Archive of Suffragist Frances Willard's Signed Letters and First Editions: "Woman is a bright fore-gleam of the better Civilization"

Archive

WILLARD, Frances. Archive of three letters and one cabinet card with engraved signature from American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. Willard became the national president of Woman's Christian Temperance Union in 1879 and remained president until her death in 1898. Since domestic violence was co-morbid with substance abuse, the WCTU aimed to protect and enfranchise women otherwise legally bound to abusive husbands. Her influence continued in the next decades, as the Eighteenth (on Prohibition) and Nineteenth (on women's suffrage) Amendments to the United States Constitution were adopted. Willard developed the slogan "Do Everything" for the WCTU and encouraged members to engage in a broad array of social reforms by lobbying, petitioning, preaching, publishing, and education. During her lifetime, Willard succeeded in raising the age of consent in many states as well as passing labor reforms including the eight-hour work day. Her vision also encompassed prison reform, scientific temperance instruction, Christian socialism, and the global expansion of women's rights. Archive includes three autograph letters signed by Willard and an original 4” x 6.25” cabinet card of Willard:

Autograph letter signed. [no date]. 1 page, 5.25” x 5.75” inches. Reads in part: "Your helpful words meant much to me and I sent them to my dear 83 year old mother, with whom I like to share my good news [...] Woman is a bright fore-gleam of the better Civilization." Near fine.

Autograph Letter Signed. December 22, 1877. 1 page. Drawing upon her reputation as an important author often published in the areas of suffrage and temperance, Willard writes to the editor of a newspaper to remind him of their "alliance" and ask that he consider running "weekly letter, review or article" written by her friend Mr. Hamilton Mable. Willard, who published profusely, maintained a productive relationship with editors like this one, and she begs "pardon [for] this much freedom from an old friend of editor and paper." Accompanied by a vintage stereoview of Willard, this letter is an interesting glimpse into the business relationships that allowed her work and those of her colleagues to reach the public.

Autograph Letter Signed. Dated May 14, 1879. 2 pages. 5-1/2 x 3-1/2 inches. Cairo, Illinois. Addressed to Mr. Bowen, concerning an upcoming speaking engagement and the arrangements to be made. Willard's platform of "Home Protection" as the premise behind suffrage was designed to appeal to women everywhere. She held that if a woman had the right to vote, she could better protect her home and family and improve society. She mentions this in her note, writing: "Mr. Bowen, 'Home Protection' will be my subject. 'Evanston' Illinois will be my address for though absent, letters will be promptly forwarded. Will arrive July 3d. If there is no objections, I will bring my secretary, Miss Anna Gordon, daughter of I.M. Gordon, former treasurer of A.B.C.F.M. Anticipating a pleasant trip, I am yours sincerely, · Frances Willard." . Very minor wear. Very good condition.

Item #17547

Price: $2,700.00