Item #17438 Collection of Original WWII German Concentration camp Letters from prisoners of Auschwitz. Holocaust Auschwitz.
Collection of Original WWII German Concentration camp Letters from prisoners of Auschwitz
Collection of Original WWII German Concentration camp Letters from prisoners of Auschwitz
Collection of Original WWII German Concentration camp Letters from prisoners of Auschwitz
Collection of Original WWII German Concentration camp Letters from prisoners of Auschwitz
Collection of Original WWII German Concentration camp Letters from prisoners of Auschwitz

Collection of Original WWII German Concentration camp Letters from prisoners of Auschwitz

Archive

[W.W.II] [Auschwitz] Archive of Original WWII German Concentration camp Letters mailed from Auschwitz by prisoners. As soon as the Nazis rose to power in Germany, Jews and other minority groups were cruelly persecuted. What started out as stripping of rights, dispossession, abuse, humiliation and starvation turned, in June 1941, into calculated, systematic and total extermination. By the end of the war, approximately ten million people had been murdered. On June 14, 1940, a transport departed from the southern Poland towards Auschwitz consisting of 728 Poles and 20 Polish Jews dubbed by the Nazis as “political prisoners” and members of the Polish resistance. The majority of the original prisoners were secondary school, college, university students and soldiers arrested in Slovakia and various towns and villages in southern Poland. KL Auschwitz was a hybrid concentration camp, designed as a large murder factory and, simultaneously, a provider of slave labor to support the Nazi war projects. This archive consist of 6 items, 5 letters and one telegram. Each letter is about 2 pages, 6" x 8¾", on a form that inmates in Auschwitz could use to send post to their relatives. Each letter has the prisoners information including name, birth date, prisoner number. On the integral leaf verso is the recipient address. All letters are dated 1941-1944. Some with Nazi red Hitler postage stamps and Auschwitz ink stamp. Also includes stamps from censors who read all outgoing mail from prisoners. Many letters are addressed to cities and towns in present-day Poland and Germany. The 4 letters are from male prisoners and addressed to their relatives. While many of these letters have an optimistic tone, Auschwitz Museum spokesperson Bartosz Bartyzel explains that “the content was subject to camp censorship and therefore could not contain any complaints about the writer's situation or information about the camp.” The content of the letters for the most part focus on the inmates general health and on updates on whether packages of food have arrived—some make special requests for onions, sugar or butter.

In 1942, Auschwitz prisoners were on starvation-level camp rations, Since Auschwitz was also a slave labor camp official began to allow some prisoners to receive food packages from families. Prisoners were also allowed to receive money orders which were then kept for them and from which they could retrieve small amounts for the canteen or to buy postage stamps. This served as a lifeline for many prisoners. All these letters are very cautiously phrased and the obvious banal content is limited to the few subject they were allowed to write about, making the letters even more chilling. Handwritten text of all the letters remains very legible.

Printed on each sheet of the letters are also the rules and regulations for sending letters from Auschwitz. “The following arrangements are to be considered in the correspondence with prisoners: 1.)  Each prisoner in protective custody may receive from and send to his relatives two letters or two cards per month. The letters to the prisoners must be legibly written in ink and may contain only 15 lines on a page.  Only a letter sheet of normal size is allowed. Letter envelopes must be unlined. Only 5 stamps of 12 pfennig may be enclosed. Everything else is prohibited and is subject to seizure. Postal cards have 10 lines.  Photos may not be used as postal cards. 2.)  Shipments of money are permitted. 3.)  It is to be noted that the precise address must be written on shipments…4.)  Newspapers are permitted, but they may be delivered only through the Auschwitz concentration camp postal facility. 5.)  Packages may not be sent, because the prisoners in the camp can purchase everything. 6.)  Requests to the camp management for releases from protective custody are useless. 7.)  Fundamentally, there is no permission to speak to and visit prisoners in the concentration camp.”

The archive consist of 6 items: 5 prisoner letters and one telegram from Auschwitz. Some of letters were written by Polish prisoners who were imprisoned at Auschwitz in 1941. One letter was written about a month after 150 Polish prisoners were executed by prison guards. One letter is from Stanislaus Kaplonell to his relatives dated November 23, 1941. Another item is a telegram from "Auschwitz" to " Alexandra Kowalczyk" the telegram note sender is from "Auschwitz", and the handwritten message in pencil and plainly states: "husband today in Auschwitz concentration camp passed away..." It is signed in Pencil " the Commandant" of the "Sipo", the Nazi Security Police and the "SD", or Sicherheitsdienst, which was the Nazi intelligence agency, with an ink stamp "Zamosc Lublin." One letter is sent by a prisoner named Stanislaus Marjau Kosowski to Radom, Poland, is postmarked In 1943. Note the prisoner is designated a security prisoner, i.e. a member of the resistance. Another letter is sent by Eduard Zidulik, and postmarked in 1943. The mail stamp has been removed on the letter, while censors were looking for hidden messages. Another is dated October 11, 1943, and is from Zygmont Jodynak, from the sub-camp of Auschwitz, Jaworzno (also known as SS-Lager Dachsgrube or Arbeitslager Neu-Dach Work Camp Neu-Dachs). Another letter was sent by a prisoner named Czestaw Florczak to his wife Anna Florczak in Lodz Poland. This handwritten letter is dated April 2, 1944. Note that this prisoner is designated a security prisoner, i.e. a member of the resistance. The 5th letter was sent by a prisoner on June 25, 1944, just a few weeks after more than 160,000 Allied troops landed on the beaches of Normandy to fight the Nazis. Camp prisoner Anton Wajcieszak writes a letter to his wife "Walli." 6 months after this letter, the Soviet army entered Auschwitz on January 27, they found approximately 7,600 sick or emaciated detainees and mounds of corpses. According to some estimates, between 1.1 million to 1.5 million people, the vast majority of them Jews, died at Auschwitz during its years of operation. As the years went on, the crimes committed there would increase in scale and senselessness. Overall the documents are in very good condition but with some partial separation at folds on a few letters. Some postal stamps are missing but no paper loss. One letter (Eduard Zidulik’s letter) edges have been taped and repaired. Tanning to extremities, and some minor soiling. Overall very good condition. A moving archive of special interest to collectors of Holocaust materials.

Item #17438

Price: $4,500.00