Item #17260 The First Congress Establishes the Continental Army, Appoints Washington as as Commander in Chief and Leads the American Revolution. Very Scarce First Edition Journals of Congress, 1775- One of the most Fundamental Documents of the American Revolution. Washington First Congress.
The First Congress Establishes the Continental Army, Appoints Washington as as Commander in Chief and Leads the American Revolution. Very Scarce First Edition Journals of Congress, 1775- One of the most Fundamental Documents of the American Revolution.
The First Congress Establishes the Continental Army, Appoints Washington as as Commander in Chief and Leads the American Revolution. Very Scarce First Edition Journals of Congress, 1775- One of the most Fundamental Documents of the American Revolution.

The First Congress Establishes the Continental Army, Appoints Washington as as Commander in Chief and Leads the American Revolution. Very Scarce First Edition Journals of Congress, 1775- One of the most Fundamental Documents of the American Revolution.

First Edition

[AMERICAN REVOLUTION] Journals of Congress, Containing the Proceedings from Sept. 5, 1774 to Jan. 1, 1776. Philadelphia: Robert Aitken, 1777. First edition of volume I only. Contemporary calf rebacked to style retaining most of lettering labels. 8 x 5 inches (20 x 13 cm); This copy has 306 pages of the original 310 pages, and without the blank endpapers. The scarce 1777 Aitken printed first edition, of the first volume of the Journals of Congress, printed during the American Revolution at Philadelphia and recounting the earliest events in the conflict from September 1774-December 1775. The Journals of the Continental Congress are the records of the daily proceedings of the Congress as kept by the office of its secretary, It was published by order of the Congress from the official minutes and printed by Robert Aitken. The title toned and chipped, toned but inside text very clean, a dampstain to the last leaf and rear pastedown,, with the booklabel of famous Americana and Presidential collector William Safire.

In 1774, the British Parliament passed a series of laws collectively known as the Intolerable Acts, with the intent to suppress unrest in colonial Boston by closing its port and placing it under martial law. This is the Journal of Congress that records the response of the 13 colonies and the start of the American revolution, including when Congress establishes the Continental Army and appointed Washington as commander in chief. The Congress met in Philadelphia on September 5, 1774, with delegates from each of the 13 colonies except Georgia. It included many of the most distinguished men of the American Revolution: ,John Adams, Samuel Adams, John Jay, John Dickinson, Richard Henry Lee and George Washington among others. On Oct. 14 they adopted a Declaration of Rights, and agreed to an Association governing imports and exports. On October 20, the Congress adopted the Articles of Association, which stated that if the Intolerable Acts were not repealed by December 1, 1774, a boycott of British goods would begin in the colonies. The Articles also outlined plans for an embargo. On October 21, the delegates approved separate statements for the people of Great Britain and the North American colonies, explaining the colonial position. Furthermore, on October 26, the delegates drafted a formal petition outlining the colonists' grievances for British King George III. Many delegates were skeptical about changing the king’s attitude towards the colonies, but believed that every opportunity should be exhausted to de-escalate the conflict. But as Massachusetts patriots had taken control of the province's arms, and organized self‐defense forces, this triggered the Battles of Lexington and Concord on 19 April 1775. When the First Congress reconvened on 10 May, on behalf of all thirteen colonies, it establishes the Continental Army and appoints George Washington as commander in chief on 15 June 1775. the Revolutionary War had begun. This Journals of Congress, Containing the Proceedings from Sept. 5, 1774 to Jan. 1, 1776, is one of the foundational documents of the American Revolution. A vital text of the nascent nation, this early journal of the primarily preparations and start of the war by the colonies against Britain and also include Indian affairs and treaties by the colonies during 1775 . The early Journals printed by Aitken are especially hard to come by "because not enough copies were printed" (Powell, 40, 72). Aitken's Volume I "is the first volume of the official edition, issued at the end of each year" Provennce of this copy: From the Collection of the late William Safire. Evans 15683.

Item #17260

Price: $8,500.00