Item #16753 Women's Education Movement. Western Female Seminary Catalog, 1868-1869. Western Female Seminary Catalog 19 cent Women Education.

Women's Education Movement. Western Female Seminary Catalog, 1868-1869.

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Women's Education Movement. Western Female Seminary Catalog, 1868-1869. Oxford, OH. Western Female Seminary was founded in 1853 as a daughter school of Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts. Its first principal Helen Peabody and most of the early faculty had been students and teachers at Mount Holyoke. Mary Lyon Residence Hall on the Western campus is named for Mount Holyok's founder, Mary Lyon. It later received a charter and became Western College, an all-female institution. Women's colleges proliferated in the mid- to late- 19th century to fill the void created by their exclusion from most institutions of higher education. The prevailing notion that women were too delicate for a rigorous academic education was openly challenged when Elizabeth Cady Stanton spoke at the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, "Man's intellectual superiority cannot be a question until woman has had a fair trial…When we shall have had our colleges, our professions, our trades, for a century, a comparison then may be justly instituted." Young women were quick to step up to the challenge; as quickly as female colleges opened, they filled up. At the time that this description is being written, no copies are recorded in American institutions. OCLC search results are at best an estimate and can vary over time.

Women's Academy and Seminary Archive recording the first important movement of women into higher education in the United States (seminary was synonymous with "academy" and did not have the religious connotation of today. In the 1800’s, the Female Academy and Seminary Movement transformed American educational norms allowing women the opportunity to receive secular, non-religious college-level education. Women's colleges proliferated in the mid- to late- 19th century to fill the void created by their exclusion from most institutions of higher education. The prevailing notion that women were too delicate for a rigorous academic education was openly challenged when Elizabeth Cady Stanton spoke at the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, "Man's intellectual superiority cannot be a question until woman has had a fair trial…When we shall have had our colleges, our professions, our trades, for a century, a comparison then may be justly instituted." Young women were quick to step up to the challenge; as quickly as female colleges opened, they filled up.

Item #16753

Price: $175.00