MLK speech calling on fellow religious leaders to take a stand for racial justice. 1958. Martin Luther King Jr.

MLK speech calling on fellow religious leaders to take a stand for racial justice. 1958

Pamphlet

Martin Luther King, Jr. Christ, the Church, and Race. Detroit: Dept. of Christian Social Relations, Episcopal Diocese of Michigan, 1958. 9 pages. Paperback with original wrapper and staple binding. Reprint of Dr. King’s keynote address at a conference on "Christ, the Church and Race" in Detroit on May 16, 1958. In this speech, MLK outlines race relations as the “chief moral dilemma” with which Christians must grapple. King relates racial equality as a religious and moral necessity, and challenges his audience—around 260 Episcopal priests and laymen—to emulate Christ and “challenge the status quo.” Additionally, he encouraged the church leaders to participate in direct action, saying: “It is not enough for the Church to be active in the ideological dimension. It must also move out into the arena of social action.” Just a few years later, many of those in the audience joined King on his historic 1963 “Walk to Freedom” in Detroit, the largest Civil Rights demonstration until the historic March on Washington. OCLC Worldcat locates only 1 other copy.

Racial equality is framed as one of the most important issues for the modern Church and the director of the organization, as stated in the introduction: “the very existence of the Church in our urban communities depends upon how we respond to this challenge.” An important speech calling on fellow religious leaders to take a stand for racial justice. MLK’s. .A few weeks later King meets on June 23 with the President to discuss problems affecting black Americans. At a Harlem book signing a few months later, on September 20, MLK is nearly killed when he is stabbed by an assailant. Rust marks on staples. Near Fine.

Item #16381

Price: $3,500.00