Item #16045 Clara Barton writes about “Vipers” at the Red Cross, one year before she Resigns. Clara Barton.
Clara Barton writes about “Vipers” at the Red Cross, one year before she Resigns
Clara Barton writes about “Vipers” at the Red Cross, one year before she Resigns

Clara Barton writes about “Vipers” at the Red Cross, one year before she Resigns

TLS : Typed Letter Signed

Barton, Clara. Founder of the American Red Cross. Typed letter signed. May 4, 1903, written from 49 East 58th Street, New York City. 4 pages. 8 x 10 ½” sheet. To Harriette Reed, President of the American First Aid Society, whom she lovingly calls “my beloved sister.” 1 vertical and 2 horizontal creases. Some toning at edges and crease of page 1. Very good.

A moving letter, written while Baron was embroiled in an internal controversy that would lead to her resignation the following year. Barton writes about her “good and true committees” where “there is not a dissenting voice,” referencing internal criticism (which she describes as “like a viper”) of her leadership and financial management skills. She writes to Reed that her main priority is to enlarge the scope of the organization so that its “humane, intelligent, organized work” can continue far after she is gone. Facing mounting criticism, Barton resigned the following year as President of the Red Cross.

Remembered later as the "Angel of the Battlefield," Barton saw the need for women's help in nursing and caring for the sick and wounded. After experiences working as a nurse in the American Civil War and with the European Red Cross in the 1860s, Barton worked tirelessly to found an American branch of the organization. US chapters first met in 1881, but were not fully recognized until 1900, when President McKinley signed a bill, which incorporated the American National Red Cross under a federal charter.

Item #16045

Price: $1,500.00